BoSCoC Onboarding Toolkit2018-08-30T09:14:16+00:00

BoSCoC Onboarding Toolkit

Thank you for taking the time to familiarize, or re-familiarize, yourself with important information regarding the Ohio Balance of State Continuum of Care (BoSCoC). Throughout this toolkit you will learn about the BoSCoC from it’s inception to it’s best practices. We hope you find this information to be helpful as you begin, or continue, your journey as an integral part of the Ohio Balance of State Continuum of Care.

Table of Contents:

HUD CoC Overview
Balance of State CoC
Agency Roles in CoC
BoSCoC Homeless Planning Regions
HMIS
Definition of Homelessness
Documenting Homelessness

HUD CoC Overview

Welcome to the first topic of the CoC Overview Lesson! Before diving into the specifics of the Ohio Balance of State Continuum of Care (BoSCoC) let’s discuss Continuum’s of Care (CoC) in general. While you may not use this information in your every day work, it can be important when taking a step back and looking at the bigger picture of the work you do. The following is a presentation created by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). This brief presentation will cover the history and regulations of the CoC Program.

Balance of State CoC

Now that you have a grasp on CoC’s in general, let’s talk specifically about the Ohio Balance of State Continuum of Care. According to HUD, “The Continuum of Care Program is designed to promote community-wide commitment to the goal of ending homelessness”. Altogether, Ohio is comprised of 9 Continuums of Care. The majority of urban counties in Ohio (Lucas, Cuyahoga, Summit, Franklin, Montgomery, Hamilton, Stark, and Mahoning) have their own Continuum of Care, and the remaining 80 non urban counties make up the Balance of State Continuum of Care. The Ohio Balance of State Continuum of Care (BoSCoC) represents the 80 largely suburban and rural counties in Ohio. Within these 80 counties there are approximately 400 homeless programs including emergency shelters, transitional housing, rapid re-housing programs, and permanent supportive housing. On any given day, these programs can serve over 7,700 persons experiencing homelessness.

Agency Roles in CoC

The Ohio BoSCoC is divided into 17 homeless planning regions. Each region has their own lead(s) who help organize and keep the region moving forward as seamlessly as possible and ensure all funding requirements are being met.

In terms of organization over all 80 counties and 17 regions, the Ohio Development Services Agency, Office of Community Development (ODSA), has been designated by the Ohio BoSCoC Board to serve as the Collaborative Applicant and the grantee for the CoC Planning grant. Additionally, ODSA staff serve as co-chair of the Ohio BOSCOC Steering Committee and have a standing seat on all other BoSCoC committees/workgroups.

COHHIO provides primary staff support for all activities pertaining to the Ohio BoSCoC including facilitating CoC committee meetings, collecting and submitting PIT/HIC data to HUD, preparing the annual BoSCoC CoC application, and implementing all processes related to program performance management and improvement. As the Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) Lead, COHHIO staff provide technical assistance to providers on the BoSCoC HMIS, basic programmatic issues, and other housing and homelessness related issues as needed. COHHIO’s Continuum of Care Director and Coordinator are the primary contacts for all Ohio BoSCoC work.

ODSA is also the state agency responsible for administering federal Emergency Solutions Grant funds and state homeless program funds. In this role, ODSA works to align state and federal program requirements and to ensure coordinated community planning across funding streams.

BoSCoC Homeless Planning Regions

As previously mentioned, the state of Ohio is divided into 8 entitlement communities and the Balance of State of State Continuum of Care (BoSCoC). The BoSCoC is even further divided into 17 homeless planning regions. Below you will find a map created by the Ohio Development Services Agency, that illustrates the 8 entitlement communities and the 17 planning regions within the BoSCoC.

The 80 counties within the Ohio BoSCoC are divided into 17 Homeless Planning Regions. Homeless program representatives in these Homeless Planning Regions plan and coordinate local homeless systems and programs and are responsible for working with ODSA and COHHIO to ensure all HUD homeless program requirements are met. The Homeless Planning Regions report to COHHIO and ODSA, not to HUD. A map of the 17 BoSCoC Homeless Planning Regions can be found below.

These Homeless Planning Regions are also responsible for meeting all requirements pertaining to state-level homeless program funding (funded through the Ohio Housing Trust Fund) administered by ODSA. These programs include the Emergency Solutions Grant Program (ESG), Homeless Crisis Response Program (HCRP), and the Supportive Housing Program (SHP). For these state programs, the Homeless Planning Regions and, in some cases, homeless services providers report directly to ODSA. More information about state-funded homeless programs can be found at http://www.development.ohio.gov/cs/cs_hshp.htm.

In sum, the Ohio BoSCoC Homeless Planning Regions help homeless services providers and communities meet the requirements of both their federal grant (HUD’s CoC Program) and state grants (ODSA’s ESG, HAGP, HCRP, and SHP).

The following map was created by ODSA and shows the 17 homeless planning regions in the Ohio BoSCoC:

HMIS

All state and federally funded Ohio BoSCoC homeless projects must use the Ohio BoSCoC Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) to maintain client and project-level data. The Ohio BoSCoC HMIS is a valuable resource because of its capacity to integrate and unduplicated data across projects in our CoC. HMIS aggregate data can be used to understand the size, characteristics, and needs of the homeless population at the client, project, and community level. The only exception to the HMIS participation requirement is for domestic violence victim services agencies, which are prohibited from entering data into HMIS and must instead use a comparable database.

All Ohio BoSCoC homeless projects participating in HMIS must abide by the Ohio BoSCoC Policies and Procedures Manual, which lays out the CoC’s policies related to maintaining system security and client confidentiality, as well as the CoC’s processes for complying with all federal regulations related to the creation and maintenance of an HMIS. Homeless projects must also comply with the Ohio BoSCoC Data Quality Standards, which outline expectations for ensuring that quality data is entered into and maintained in the HMIS.

Definition of Homelessness

The Homeless definition is comprised of four categories:

  1. Literally homeless individuals/families
    • Literal Homelessness is further defined as homeless individuals/families who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, meaning:
      • Sleeping in a place not designed for or ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation, such as a place not meant for human habitation
      • Living in an emergency shelter or transitional housing designated to provide temporary living arrangements (including hotel/motel stays paid for by charitable or government programs)
      • Exiting an institution where the individual resided for less than 90 days and where the individual entered the institution immediately from emergency shelter (including hotel/motel stays paid for by charitable or government programs) or an unsheltered location
  2. Individuals/families who will imminently (within 14 days) lose their primary nighttime residence with no subsequent residence AND no resources or support networks
  3. Unaccompanied youth or families with children/youth who meet the homeless definition under another federal statute and three additional criteria
  4. Individual/families fleeing or attempting to flee domestic violence with no subsequent residence AND no resource support networks

Different agencies use different definitions of homelessness, which affect how various programs determine eligibility for individuals and families at the state and local level.  

Documenting Homelessness

Ohio BoSCoC homeless projects must document and maintain records related to participant eligibility and the services provided to participants.

In relation to homeless status, providers must maintain records documenting acceptable evidence of participants’ homeless status. Acceptable evidence generally includes third party written verification of participants’ stay in an unsheltered location, in an emergency shelter, or in a Transitional Housing (TH) program (where participants are eligible to move from TH into Rapid Re-Housing (RRH) or Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH), for example).

Also remember, when documenting homeless status, HUD requires compliance with their preferred order of priority. This means that homeless status must be documented first with third-party written verification of homelessness (HMIS record, documentation on letterhead from shelter or TH project). If that documentation is not attainable, only then can third-party oral verification be used as documentation, and only after case workers have documented their due diligence in attempting to obtain third-party written verification of homeless status. Self-certification of homeless status is only permitted if neither third-party written nor third-party oral verification could be obtained, and due diligence was documented.

Table of Contents:

What is Coordinated Entry?
Regional Access Points
What is Diversion?
Community Resource Lists

What is Coordinated Entry?

Coordinated Entry (CE), also known as coordinated intake or coordinated assessment, is a system that allows for coordinated entry into a local homeless services system, as well as coordinated movement within and ultimately exit from the system. Coordinated Entry increases the efficiency of a homeless assistance system by standardizing access to homeless services and coordinating program referrals. In particular, an improved CE system will help the Ohio Balance of State Continuum of Care (BoSCoC) to advance our goals of helping households quickly access appropriate services to address housing crises, increasing exits to housing, decreasing length of time homeless, and reducing returns to homelessness.

As part of the Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act (HEARTH) regulations that govern Continuum of Care (CoC) and Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) funding, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) requires all CoCs across the United States to implement Coordinated Entry.[1

According to HUD guidance, key elements of Coordinated Entry include:

  • Access: ensures the entire Continuum of Care (CoC) area is covered and that service access points are easily accessible and well advertised.
  • Assessment: standardizes information gathering on service needs, housing barriers, and vulnerabilities.
  • Prioritization: matches the output of the assessment tool to community priorities based on severity of need, and establishes a priority rank for available housing and services, and
  • Referral: coordinates the connection of individuals to the appropriate and available housing and service intervention.[2]

[1] https://www.hudexchange.info/homelessness-assistance/hearth-act/ (retrieved on July 10, 2015)

[2] https://www.hudexchange.info/resources/documents/Coordinated-Entry-Policy-Brief.pdf (retrieved on July 10, 2015)

Regional Access Points

Stakeholders in homeless systems need to be aware of the various access points into the homeless system in a given region or county. Clear understanding about points of access into the system helps ensure that persons experiencing homelessness, or at-risk of homelessness, are most quickly and effectively entered into or diverted from homeless systems as appropriate.

Access points must be willing and able to serve those who are fleeing or attempting to flee, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking but who are seeking shelter or services from non-victim service providers. Access points must be able to serve domestic violence victims in ways that help ensure safety if no victim service provider is available.

Identification of Access Points

Standard No. 3A  CE plans identify all local access points to the homeless system and how those points are accessed. Identification of access points includes the following:

  • Names of providers serving as CE access points.
    • All providers that have agreed to serve as CE access points must enter into an MOA with each other and with the Regional Planning Group. The MOA must include the following:
      • Identification of all parties entering into the MOA.
      • Contact information per the procedure below.
      • Agreement that any needed changes will be communicated to all parties.
  • Contact information for CE access points, including:
    • Physical address*
    • Phone number*
    • Hours of operation, including after-hours information.

Standard No. 3B – All CE access points are easily available both for those needing to call and those needing to visit in-person. Victim service providers may choose to only make their phone numbers available and conduct Diversion Screening over the phone, as long as other local access points can accommodate in-person meetings.

Standard No. 3C – Homeless Planning Regions’ access points will be listed on COHHIO’s website for reference. The Homeless Planning Region Executive Committee is responsible for updating the access point list annually and sharing any changes with CE staff.

What is Diversion?

Diversion determines if a household experiencing a housing crisis can return to housing or find alternative housing outside of the crisis response system. Diversion involves utilizing mainstream resources and mediation techniques to assist the household in identifying alternative housing options, including but not limited to returning to their own housing, staying with family/friends, or relocation to another area. Diversion should only take place with people who are literally homeless or at risk of homelessness within seven days prior to the potential housing crisis. Providers should incorporate a strengths-based, person-centered approach to help the household maintain or find safe, stable housing.

Community Resource Lists

The Community Resources List includes information on mainstream services including, but not limited to local food/clothing pantries, healthcare providers, benefits banks, employment/job training services, and legal services and is distributed to both clients as well as persons who are diverted from the crisis response system so that they can pursue non-housing related assistance on their own.

  • The Homeless Planning Region’s lead agency will update the Available Housing List and Community Resource List annually.
  • The Available Housing List and Community Resource List will be available on every provider’s website in the region and/or each provider will also have hard copies to reference and distribute to clients as needed.

Table of Contents:

Housing First
Permanent Supportive Housing
Rapid Rehousing
Transitional Housing
Low Barrier Systems

Housing First

Housing First emerged as an alternative to the linear approach in which people experiencing homelessness were required to first participate in and graduate from short-term residential and treatment programs before obtaining permanent housing. In the linear approach, permanent housing was offered only after a person experiencing homelessness could demonstrate that they were “ready” for housing. By contrast, Housing First is premised on the following principles:

  • Homelessness is first and foremost a housing crisis and can be addressed through the provision of safe and affordable housing.
  • All people experiencing homelessness, regardless of their housing history and duration of homelessness, can achieve housing stability in permanent housing. Some may need very little support for a brief period of time, while others may need more intensive and long-term supports.
  • Everyone is “housing ready.” Sobriety, compliance in treatment, or even criminal histories are not necessary to succeed in housing. Rather, homelessness programs and housing providers must be “consumer ready.”
  • Many people experience improvements in quality of life, in the areas of health, mental health, substance use, and employment, as a result of achieving housing.
  • People experiencing homelessness have the right to self-determination and should be treated with dignity and respect.
  • The exact configuration of housing and services depends upon the needs and preferences of the population.

The following video was created by Carpenter’s Church in Lubbock, Texas, and provides information regarding the benefits of the Housing First model:

Permanent Supportive Housing

According to HUD Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH) is permanent housing with indefinite leasing or rental assistance paired with supportive services to assist homeless persons with a disability or families with an adult or child member with a disability achieve housing stability. Put simply, PSH is decent, safe, and affordable housing for persons experiencing homelessness and who also have a disability.

Key Elements of PSH:

  • Tenants have full rights and responsibilities under landlord tenant law
  • Participation in support services is voluntary
  • Tenants do not pay more than 30% of their income toward rent and utilities
  • Housing is not time-limited

Who is Eligible for PSH:

All PSH projects in the Ohio BosCoC must serve persons who meet category 1 of HUD’s homeless definition AND are diagnosed with a disability:

  • Category 1: Literally homeless individuals/families
    • Literal homelessness is further defined as homeless individuals /families who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, meaning:
      • Sleeping in a place not designed for or ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation, such as a place not meant for human habitation
      • Living in an emergency shelter or transitional housing designated to provide temporary living arrangements (including hotel/motel stays paid for by charitable or government programs)
      • Exiting an institution where the individual resided for less than 90 days and where the individual entered the situation immediately from emergency shelter (including hotel/motel stays paid for by charitable or government programs) or an unsheltered location

PSH projects are also allowed to serve those who match Category 4 of HUD’s homeless definition:

  • Category 4: Individuals/families fleeing or attempting to flee domestic violence with no subsequent residence AND no resources or support networks

Chronic Homeless Order of Priority

  1. Chronically homeless individuals/families with the longest history of homelessness and most severe service need.
  2. Chronically homeless individuals/families with the longest history of homelessness
  3. Chronically homeless individuals/families with the most severe service needs
  4. All other chronically homeless individuals

Rapid Rehousing

Rapid Re-Housing (RRH) is a short-term intervention to help individuals and families exit homelessness as quickly as possible, move into permanent housing, and achieve stability in housing.

RRH Eligibility

Much like PSH projects, RRH projects must serve persons who meet category 1 of HUD’s homeless definition:

  • Category 1: Literally homeless individuals/families
    • Literal homelessness is further defined as homeless individuals /families who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, meaning:
      • Sleeping in a place not designed for or ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation, such as a place not meant for human habitation
      • Living in an emergency shelter or transitional housing designated to provide temporary living arrangements (including hotel/motel stays paid for by charitable or government programs)
      • Exiting an institution where the individual resided for less than 90 days and where the individual entered the situation immediately from emergency shelter (including hotel/motel stays paid for by charitable or government programs) or an unsheltered location

Furthermore, RRH projects/services funded through HCRP are permitted to serve households currently residing in Transitional Housing. However, RRH projects funded through HUD’s CoC Program can only serve persons/households currently in emergency shelter or unsheltered locations.

RRH Prioritization

RRH projects should be targeted to individuals and households who are unable to resolve their homelessness on their own but do not have service needs so great as to necessitate movement into Transitional Housing or Permanent Supportive Housing. Within this population, RRH providers should prioritize those with greater vulnerabilities and less likelihood of exiting homelessness without rapid re-housing assistance.

Additionally, when there is an eligible homeless veteran who is not eligible for VA programs, RRH providers should prioritize the homeless veteran for assistance.

Housing First in RRH

All Ohio BosCoC homeless assistance projects must follow a Housing First approach. This means that projects must:

  • Reduce barriers to entry
  • Ensure that Support Services are voluntary
  • Provide housing focused assistance (i.e. other areas of concern are secondary)

Youtube video created by: National Alliance to End Homelessness

Transitional Housing

The purpose of Transitional Housing (TH) projects is to facilitate the movement of homeless individuals and families to permanent housing as quickly as possible. TH projects should be targeted to persons who have been assessed as not being able to quickly resolve their homelessness on their own, but who do not have needs great enough to necessitate placement into Permanent Supportive Housing.

TH Eligibility

All TH projects must serve those who meet category 1 or 4 of HUD’s homeless definition:

  • Category 1: Literally homeless individuals/families
    • Literal homelessness is further defined as homeless individuals /families who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, meaning:
      • Sleeping in a place not designed for or ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation, such as a place not meant for human habitation
      • Living in an emergency shelter or transitional housing designated to provide temporary living arrangements (including hotel/motel stays paid for by charitable or government programs)
      • Exiting an institution where the individual resided for less than 90 days and where the individual entered the situation immediately from emergency shelter (including hotel/motel stays paid for by charitable or government programs) or an unsheltered location
  • Category 4: Individuals/families fleeing or attempting to flee domestic violence with no subsequent residence AND no resources or support networks

TH Target Populations & Prioritization

Appropriate target populations may include those with service needs that have been identified as being more long-term in duration, but not indefinite. These may be target populations such as domestic violence survivors, individuals with histories of substance abuse disorders or those in early recovery, or transition aged youth. Within identified target populations, TH projects should further screen homeless applicants to identify people with greater vulnerabilities and prioritize those applicants for assistance.

Low Barrier Systems

Low barrier systems refers to keeping program entry requirements and pre-requisites to a minimum. For example, a low barrier program would eliminate sobriety and income requirements and other policies that make it difficult to enter and/or access a program. If used effectively with housing first, systems can increase exits from homelessness to stable housing and lower lengths of time homeless.

Table of Contents:

Harm Reduction
Progressive Engagement
Motivational Interviewing
Client De-escalation
Progress Note Basics
Trauma Informed Care
Self Care

Harm Reduction

According to the National Healthcare for the Homeless, harm reduction can be defined as:

Harm reduction is an approach for substance use treatment that involves a set of practical techniques that are openly negotiated with clients around what is most likely to be achieved.

The focus is on reducing the negative consequences and risky behaviors of substance use; it neither condones nor condemns any behavior. By incorporating strategies on a continuum from safer drug use, to managed substance use, up to abstinence, harm reduction practice helps clients affect positive changes in their lives.

The harm reduction philosophy embraces respect, trust and a nonjudgmental stance as the essential components of an effective therapeutic relationship. A basic assumption in this approach is that clients want to make positive changes and the skilled clinician uses motivational strategies to help clients move along the change continuum as far as possible. Harm Reduction Principles

  • Individual’s decision to use is accepted
  • Individual is treated with dignity
  • Individual is expected to take responsibility for his or her own behavior
  • Individuals have a voice
  • Reducing harm, not consumption
  • No pre-defined outcomes

YouTube video by: Harm Reduction Action Center

Progressive Engagement

Building Changes describes Progressive Engagement as  an approach to support families to quickly self-resolve their homelessness by tailoring services to offer just what is needed.

In a progressive engagement (PE) approach, a family seeking housing receives a small amount of assistance, tailored to their most critical need, with a keen focus on quickly resolving the housing crisis. The family keeps in regular contact with their provider, mutually monitoring whether the initial support was successful. If needed, the provider can adjust the amount and intensity of tailored service until the family has obtained permanent housing. With PE, the family and provider work together to get the family into housing first, and then may identify additional goals. The PE approach can be broadly applied within your homeless housing system, complementing strategies such as Diversion and Rapid Re-Housing. PE can help improve efficiency across the entire system and community by matching the most intensive and expensive resources with the families who demonstrate they need them most.

Motivational Interviewing

What is MI?

Motivational Interviewing includes a set of practices designed to initiate and build collaborative conversations between people.  Detailed by Stephen Rollnick and William Miller in 1991, MI practices can be used in almost any setting with any population and always focus on the idea of change, while drawing upon what a person already knows, what one has experienced and where they want to be. Motivational Interviewing practices utilize active listening, participant engagement, recognition of barriers and trust that honors a person’s autonomy. MI conversations are built to be non-judgmental, non-confrontational and non-adversarial. MI helps people envision a better future and increases their motivation to achieve it, while acknowledging both the barriers and the successes along the way.

YouTube video by: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Client De-escalation

While we all hope that every interaction we have with others will be positive and easy going, we all know that that is not always the case. At some point we are all confronted with someone who is feeling hurt, disappointed, angry, or any negative emotion that has the potential to create conflict. One way to deal with situations like this is to verbally de-escalate the person and make them feel heard. The following are 10 De-Escalation tips according to the Crisis Prevention Institute:

  1. Be empathetic and nonjudgemental
  2. Respect Personal Space
  3. Use nonthreatening nonverbals
  4. Avoid overreacting
  5. Focus on feelings
  6. Ignore challenging questions
  7. Set limits
  8. Choose wisely what you insist upon
  9. Allow silence for reflection
  10. Allow time for decisions

For more information about these top 10 tips, visit the Crisis Prevention Institute’s presentation located here http://jpschools.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Nonviolent-Crisis-Intervention-pdf.pdf

Vector Credit: Vecteezy.com

Progress Note Basics

When working with clients it is important to document your interactions in a clear, accurate, objective, and concise manner. Documentation is important for several reasons. For one, it helps the service provider recall the circumstances and history of a client that they are working with. It also allows agencies the opportunity to quickly learn about a client and their situation should the provider not be able to assist them in an emergency or if they have left the agency.

Important tips to remember about progress notes are:

  • Notes should be as concise as possible
  • Notes should only include objective information rather than subjective opinions
  • Notes should be accurate and reflect the services provided
  • Notes should only include information that is necessary to helping the client

And always remember…If it isn’t documented, it didn’t happen!

Trauma Informed Care

Trauma Informed Care Resources

According to SAMHSA’s concept of a trauma-informed approach, “A program, organization, or system that is trauma-informed:

  1. Realizes the widespread impact of trauma and understands potential paths for recovery;
  2. Recognizes the signs and symptoms of trauma in clients, families, staff, and others involved with the system;
  3. Responds by fully integrating knowledge about trauma into policies, procedures, and practices; and
  4. Seeks to actively resist re-traumatization.”

A trauma-informed approach can be implemented in any type of service setting or organization and is distinct from trauma-specific interventions or treatments that are designed specifically to address the consequences of trauma and to facilitate healing.

YouTube videos by: American Institute for Research

Self-Care

Finally, we want to address the importance of self-care. As social service professionals we spend a lot of our time consumed in other people’s crisis’ and trauma. Many times the work that we do even comes home with us at the end of the day and we either find ourselves literally working at home, or consumed by thinking about the work that we have left behind. While doing those things can be fine in moderation, it is imperative that we find ways to take care of ourselves so that we can continue to best serve our clients and avoid burnout.

Self Care Tips:

Table of Contents:

Common Acronym List
Important Websites
COHHIO Staff Contacts

Common Acronym List

HUD – Housing and Urban Development

ODSA – Ohio Developmental Services Agency

COHHIO – Coalition on Homelessness and Housing in Ohio

BoSCoC – Balance of State Continuum of Care

HMIS – Homeless Management Information System

CE – Coordinated Entry

RRH – Rapid Re-Housing

PSH – Permanent Supportive Housing

PIT/HIC – Point-in-Time Count/Housing Inventory Count

SSVF – Supportive Services for Veteran Families

VA – Veterans Affairs

AMI – Area Median Income

SHP – Supportive Housing Program

S + C – Shelter Plus Care

VASH – Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing

TH – Transitional Housing

QPR – Quarterly Performance Report

APR – Annual Performance Report

PHA – Public Housing Authority

HCRP – Homeless Crisis Response Program

SSI/SSDI – Social Security Income/Social Security Disability Income

DJFS – Department of Jobs and Family Services

HF – Housing First

VI-SPDAT – Vulnerability Index – Service Provider Decision Assistance Tool

ES – Emergency Shelter

SH – Supportive Housing

Please also reference the National Alliance to End Homelessness acronym list:

NAEH Acronyms

Important Websites

Coalition on Homelessness and Housing in Ohio (COHHIO)

Ohio Developmental Services Agency

Housing and Urban Development (HUD

HUD CoC Toolkit

COHHIO Staff Contacts

BoSCoC Staff:

Erica Mulyran, Continuum of Care Director, Ext 118, ericamulryan@cohhio.org

Hannah Basting, Continuum of Care Coordinator, Ext 117, hannahbasting@cohhio.org

Sandy Sechang, Continuum of Care Specialist, Ext 137, sandysechang@cohhio.org

Chloé Greene, Coordinated Entry Specialist, Ext 119, chloegreene@cohhio.org

HMIS: 

Genelle Denzin, HMIS Data Analyst, Ext 123, genelledenzin@cohhio.org

Matt Dicks, HMIS TA&T Support Coordinator, Ext 120, mattdicks@cohhio.org

Amanda Wilson, HMIS Support Coordinator, Ext 115, amandawilson@cohhio.org